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    • Direct X-Static
      Editing a comment
      All signs point to PS5 using current gen PC Navi which means no RCC's. PC and PS5 can be sad together.

  • No. Navi Lite 10

    Comment


    • #boom
      sl1,new AMD RT accelerator based on CU routing to TA,TD, TCP, (NOC concept) diagram

      sl2 Boom
      X1 CU, modified to distribute workload (NOC)

      Sl3,X1 XDK, the Gfxcore part 24TA, 24TD, 48TCP,
      not Processing part(Jag+GCN as Scalar)

      #soon
      #DX12_unlock
      #12_X_means_more












      Comment


      • Direct X-Static
        Editing a comment
        "The term texture cache is kind of a misnomer; the texture caches are used for all memory accesses that are not handles by the color and depth blocks."

        So the XDK confirms that the caches are not used in the same way as normal GCN caches work. Beta tested in the future, right Mr. C?

      • mistercteam
        Editing a comment
        yes it is
        even based on GCN, it is architected for RT/irregular workload
        dataflow based



    • blue nugroho
      @blueisviolet
      1m1 minute ago More



      now we rotate it to made easier
      comparing high level diagram

      as slide3 XDK said #boom word
      referring this unit as Texture unit is misleading !!













      Comment


      • Direct X-Static
        Editing a comment
        Oh good, I was on the right track regarding the texture cache in your previous post. The similarities between the XB1 architecture and the recent patent are obvious, judging by the slides!

      • mistercteam
        Editing a comment
        indeed DirectX

    • Cyberpunk 2077 Xbox One X 4K Resolution Revealed Through MS Store; Requires at Least 80GB on PlayStation 4



      According to the official Microsoft Store, CD Projekt Red’s upcoming Cyberpunk 2077 will support 4K resolution on Microsoft’s enhanced Xbox One console, the Xbox One X.

      As reported by Gamepressure, the Microsoft Store listing mentions that the highly-anticipated action-RPG will be Xbox One X enhanced and will support 4K Ultra HD. Details about the specific Xb1X enhancements that the title will feature are unknown at this point.

      In addition to 4K support for Microsoft’s enhanced Xbox, the official PlayStation Store has revealed that the game will require at least 80GB of free space on PlayStation 4. Further details about the PS4 and PS4 Pro versions of the game are absent.

      From what we’ve seen so far, Cyberpunk 2077 will be an impressive looking game, and as covered earlier this week, the behind-closed-doors 2019 E3 demo was running on an Intel i7 -8700k CPU and NVIDIA TITAN RTX GPU at 1080p Ultra Settings with RTX enabled.

      For those interested, this E3 2019 demo will be released to the public in a few months at PAX West 2019.

      Cyberpunk is slated for a release on Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC on April 16, 2020.




      https://wccftech.com/cyberpunk-2077-xbox-one-x-4k/

      :)

      Comment


      • angryguy77
        Editing a comment
        It's going to be tough, but I can't bring myself to play it at release when new HW is right around the corner.

      • OrionWolf
        Editing a comment
        angryguy77 even closer when you consider that Scarlett is releasing 5 months later. I wonder if we're getting some sort of special edition for the launch of the next gen consoles?

    • Processing Power (non RT) = CPU+CPU acclrtr (GCN based on X1 family)

      X1 to X1X=1080p to 4K, need 4 times prcssing power=6TF
      X1X to X2=4K to 8K,just like above need 4x Prcssing, but this time
      there is efficiency gain,real TF not listd (because to achieve that same 4x perf need less TF,
      as better and improved CU design)

      but still 4 times res=usually need 4x more processing






      Comment


      • Ace Combat 7: DLC 2: ADF-01 FALKEN Trailer



        :)

        Comment


        • now this seems start to relate ....
          #soon ...









          Comment


          • The Global Games Market Will Generate $152.1 Billion in 2019 as the U.S. Overtakes China as the Biggest Market

            We are proud to announce that today marks the official launch of our 2019 Global Games Market Report. The report, the games business’s standard for understanding and sizing the global games market, boasts a detailed breakdown of the market in terms of revenue and gamer forecasts per segment. The report explores the market trends shaping and driving the landscape of the game, further zooming in on the latest developments per segment and region. In this article, we will dive into some of the report’s key findings, focusing on the new numbers.

            We also made some of the high-level findings available in a free version of the report. Download it here.

            Now more than ever, gaming is at the heart of the entertainment business. The way consumers engage with and through games is constantly changing. Not only does this result in more overall engagement, but it also leads to entirely new segments of game enthusiasts. There are now more than 2.5 billion gamers across the world. Combined, they will spend $152.1 billion on games in 2019, representing an increase of +9.6% year on year.

            Console will be the fastest-growing segment this year, growing +13.4% year on year to $47.9 billion in 2019. This is the second year running that growth in console games will outpace mobile gaming growth. Last year’s regulatory changes in China, as well as the absence of new global blockbusters, signaled slowed growth for mobile games. What’s more, rising anticipation toward the next generation of consoles will slow down the market during the second half of the year.

            Mobile gaming (smartphone and tablet), meanwhile, remains the largest segment in 2019, growing +10.2% year on year to $68.5 billion—45% of the global games market. Of this, $54.9 billion will come from smartphone games. PC gaming will be both the smallest and slowest-growing segment, increasing +4.0% year on year to $35.7 billion. Despite the segment being smaller in size, PC’s status as the bedrock of innovation in the games market remains evident to this day. Nearly all of the most popular game genres, including battle royale and MOBA, can trace their roots back to PC gaming’s modding community.

            Important note: We review our games market estimates every quarter and update them if necessary. You can always find the latest numbers here.







            The U.S. Is Now the World’s #1 Games Market


            In 2019, the U.S. will overtake China as the world’s largest gaming market by revenues. Overall, the U.S. games market will generate $36.9 billion this year, predominantly driven by its +13.9% growth in console game revenues. At $18.5 billion, console represents more than 50% of the total games market in the U.S.. Meanwhile, China’s nine-month licensing freeze on new games, as well as measures to reduce screen time among children, are still felt throughout 2019. Publishers, however, are now able to monetize their new games once more, but the consequences of the freeze and new approval process will still impact growth in the Chinese market this year. Japan, South Korea, and Germany round off the top five countries by game revenues in 2019. We have updated our Top 10 Countries by Game Revenues Ranking with these results. Global Games Market Continues Its Trajectory of Healthy Growth


            In the report, we also present our forecasts for the global games market toward 2022. Consumer spend on games will grow to $196.0 billion by 2022, a CAGR of +9.0% between 2018 and 2022.

            Mobile gaming will generate revenues of $95.4 billion in 2022 and account for almost half of the entire games market. This will be driven predominantly by smartphones, with revenues of $79.7 billion by 2022. Although mobile is indeed still the world’s fastest-growing games market segment, growth is slowing in mature markets such as North America, Western Europe, and Japan. Emerging markets, including Southeast Asia, India, and Middle East & North Africa, will contribute most to the segment’s growth. However, a range of other factors are also contributors, including more cross-platform titles, more smartphone users, and improvements to both mobile hardware and mobile Internet infrastructure, including the rollout of 5G networks.



            Revenues generated by the console segment will reach $61.1 billion in 2022, increasing with a CAGR of +9.7%. These revenues will dip slightly from the second half of 2019 to 2021, as the imminent release of the next-generation Xbox and PlayStation consoles will see consumers spending most of their gaming budget on hardware. However, the upcoming new Switch model(s), as well as the massive installed base of the previous (now current) console generation will contribute to healthy growth in the segment.

            The overall PC gaming market will grow with a CAGR of +3.5% to total $39.5 billion by 2022. The ongoing consumer shift from browser PC games to downloaded/boxed PC games will reduce the browser segment’s revenues by almost half from 2018 to 2022. Downloaded/boxed PC games, though, will grow with a CAGR of +5.4%, generating $37.3 billion by 2022.

            Growth in mobile game revenues will continue to outpace growth on PC in the coming years, resulting in a shrinking PC market share toward 2022. Mobile will also outpace console’s revenue growth; yet, console’s market share will remain relatively static. Despite China’s Licensing Freeze, APAC Remains the Biggest Region by Game Revenues


            This year, the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region will produce game revenues of $72.2 billion, accounting for 47% of the global total. This represents year-on-year growth of +7.6%. China’s licensing freeze also impacted South Korean and Japanese publishers, with many increasingly depending on Chinese players for revenue growth. China remains the most important market in the region for the coming years, and will reclaim its spot as the #1 gaming market by revenue in 2020. The fastest-growing markets are emerging markets such as South East Asia and India, where Western and Eastern publishers are vying for players’ time and money.



            Once more, North America will be the second-largest region (by game revenues), taking more than a quarter of 2019’s total games market with $39.6 billion. This represents a +11.7% increase from last year, the fastest year-on-year growth rate of any region, almost entirely due to consecutive successful years for console gaming. Game revenue growth in the Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) region will be slightly lower than North America’s. With a year-on-year growth of +11.5%, EMEA will generate revenues of $34.7 billion this year, representing 23% of the total global games market. Meanwhile, Latin America will make up 4% of the games market, growing +11.1% year on year to $5.6 billion.

            Download the free version of the report here. Newzoo’s Global Games Market Report: More than a Report


            Looking to access deeper trends, revenue and gamer forecasts per segment, and consumer insights—globally, regionally, and for 30 key countries? Look no further than Newzoo’s Global Games Market Report subscription.

            And it’s so much more than just a report. This 12-month service includes four quarterly update reports and dashboard access. The quarterly reports detail any changes to our games market estimates along with the latest market developments. Through the dashboard, you can access all of our market data globally, per region, and per country – allowing you to easily slice and dice the data and export your own custom charts. Want to know more? Contact us at questions@newzoo.com.





            https://newzoo.com/insights/articles...iggest-market/

            :)

            Comment


            • another inline M Mantor dual pipeline patent for scheduling
              reference for later

              side note: interesting that so many XDK diagram and IEEE John sell start to become inline conceptually , remember we not chasing 1:1 perfect match with patent









              Comment


              • Crackdown 3 Free Flying High Campaign Update Available Now



                Welcome back, Agents!

                Last month, we gave you Crackdown 3’s Keys to the City, providing a deep menu of Campaign tools and cheats to unleash unprecedented havoc, alongside a new vanity progression system for Wrecking Zone. Today, we’re excited to announce the free Flying High Campaign update, available with Xbox Game Pass and on Xbox One and Windows 10 PC.

                With Flying High you have new gadgets to collect, new Achievements to earn—and a whole new way to explore the expansive, vertical world of New Providence.

                It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s you soaring above the city with the Agency Wingsuit! Reach new heights, attack enemies from above, and test your flying skills in one of seven Wingsuit races.

                Eager to bring even more boom? Try the Clusterduck grenade and its chain-reaction explosions. If that doesn’t fit the duckbill, make it rain with the Hellstorm Flare to call in air-strikes from the Island Defense Turrets or deploy the Agency Peacekeeper Beacon to summon Civilian Militia backup.



                But that’s not all! Unearth the Elemental Forge gadget to summon four over-the-top melee weapons, each with its own unique environmental damage effects. Light up your foes with the Flaming Sword, give them a shocking send-off with the Electric Hammer, keep it cool with the Ice Mace, or be the toxin of the town with the Chimera Axe. Swing, smash and throw each weapon to unleash chaotic fun.

                We can’t thank you enough for your continued support of Crackdown 3. With a total of 14 new Achievements and 500 Gamerscore, the free Flying High update is yours for the taking, so get to it Agents!

                Crackdown 3 is available now with Xbox Game Pass and on Xbox One and Windows 10 PC. For the latest on Crackdown 3 and all things Xbox stay tuned to Xbox Wire.




                https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2019/06/...available-now/

                :)

                Comment


                • Direct X-Static
                  Editing a comment
                  This update looks pretty cool. Thanks for the support, MS!

              • E3 2019: Battletoads Revives Cartoonish Brawling



                The original Battletoads, developed by Rare, arrived in 1991 to enthrall gamers. Now the three toads — Pimple, Rash, and Zitz — have been revived by Diala Studios and Rare for a new three-player beat ‘em up, available soon with Xbox Game Pass, that looks to bring all the great platforming features fans of the series are looking for.

                I played two levels on the floor at the Xbox E3 Showcase. One was a section of a side-scrolling beat ‘em up level; the other a revamped version of the original game’s notorious Turbo Tunnel, now presented as a forward-scrolling 3D experience. Here’s what I learned, without any mention of all the bruises sustained.



                Time to Morph

                The side-scrolling portion of the demo sets the three toads in search of a boss called Porkshank — who offers competitive wages and paternity leave to hired minions — but they’ve got to bash through dozens of said goons to reach him. Familiar actions are mapped to the face buttons: Attack, jump, launch, and a modifier that engages Morph attacks and can be held for special charge attacks. And, of course, there are tongue attacks enabled by LT.

                Multiple X presses chains together simple combos, while Y launches enemies into the air — after which further X presses can create in-air combos. B modifies attacks, so you can turn Zitz into a giant robot which fires lasers from his eyes. While launched in air, he can morph into a jackhammer to pummel enemies below. The action is instantly familiar to anyone who has played a similar brawler but executed with precision to offer a challenge worthy of the game’s legacy.



                Into the Turbo Tunnel

                In the original game’s tunnel traversals, players saw flashing warnings to indicate upcoming obstacles. This presentation is slightly different since you can see everything further up the track as you fly towards it all. No need for those intentionally confusing warnings!

                There are checkpoints, which the original game never had, so you won’t have to play an entire course over and over — just sections of a course. And while you can see some of what’s coming down the track, obstacles will frequently block much of the view. Flawless performance will likely require repeated play and memorization rather than pure reflexes. The course and object design help with that process, and I got through the whole level while teamed up with a couple strangers.



                When playing solo, dying with your chosen character will cause the next toad to drop in immediately, and so on until you’ve gone through all three. Then it’s back to the checkpoint — probably with a cheeky note about how, after 25 years, poor performance is all you’ve got to give. Playing as a team offers an advantage: So long as one toad remains, those who crash out will spawn back in without having to repeat a checkpoint, so the team can collectively daisy-chain respawns to get through tricky sections.

                Saturday Morning Spirit

                Coming as it did in the wake of the 1989 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles arcade co-op basher and its console ports, the original Battletoads always felt like a companion to a cartoon that didn’t exist. (A half-hour pilot was later produced, in 1992.) This revived title is drenched in late ‘90s animated style, with wild and exaggerated character designs and movement.



                Some of that exaggeration helps separate the characters from one another, especially as the screen fills with all three toads and five or six mobs. There can be a lot going on at any one time, and the big morph attack animations make it easier to keep all the combatants straight. Not that it will make your Battletoads life any easier in the long run; these guys have a reputation to maintain.

                Battletoads will be available for Xbox One with Xbox Game Pass in the not-too-distant future.



                https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2019/06/...nish-brawling/

                :)

                Comment


                • Microsoft talks Project Scarlett ID@Xbox plans

                  Chris Charla discusses consolidation, subscription services and curation.

                  It's been a few weeks since the Xbox E3 briefing, which has just about given us enough time to calm down from the excitement of Keanu Reeves appearing onstage. The other big news from that conference, of course, surrounded Project Scarlett - Xbox's mysterious next-generation console, which we now know is arriving in Holiday 2020 with Halo Infinite. And we finally got to hear some official specs - although many of the details remain hazy.

                  Well, we heard a bit about that triple-A title during the briefing, but what about the indies? What does Project Scarlett mean for them?

                  Inside the bustling Microsoft Theatre during E3 week, I sat down with ID@Xbox senior director Chris Charla to discuss Project Scarlett (as much as we could), along with more general topics such as the impact of subscription services and consolidation on independent developers, and Charla's thoughts on the wider game curation debate.


                  I thought I'd start off with the exciting news about Project Scarlett - is ID@Xbox going to work the same way next-gen?

                  Chris Charla: Yeah, absolutely. There's no plans to change it. Our main goal at the start of the program is our main goal now, just to make life easy for indie developers - if we can make life easy for them and make getting onto the platform as easy as possible, then we're gonna have lots of great content, we're gonna have lots of diverse content, and players are gonna be happy. And that won't change at all.

                  Do indie devs have dev kits yet for Project Scarlett? Or is it too early for that?

                  Chris Charla: I don't think we're talking about dev kit availability right now. I apologise, I can't really amplify anything that was said about Scarlett more than what Phil talked about onstage.

                  Do current indies need to do anything to get their games ready for back compat for Scarlett?

                  Chris Charla: No - one of the things about back compat is it just works. Phil said onstage that every game that plays on Xbox One is going to play on Scarlett, and so we're super excited for that.



                  What are you looking forward to, in terms of the opportunities offered by Project Scarlett?

                  Chris Charla: When we're looking at the hardware capabilities, it's really exciting, and I'm really excited about ray tracing - not just for graphics, but for the other things you can do with ray tracing like using ray tracing for collision, and even audio.

                  Any time I think about what independent developers are doing, I fall into two things - one is, I'm excited for people to just play the awesome games independent developers are doing. One of the cool things about the Xbox Game Pass program we pioneered has been that a lot more independent games are being played by people on the Game Pass - that's super exciting.

                  But the other thing I'm excited for is the stuff that I have no idea what it is. When we started ID@Xbox in 2013, one of the questions was "what are you most excited about?", and at the time I was said "stuff I can't even imagine". I couldn't imagine Cuphead at the time - that somebody would hand draw all those frames of animation, someone who's never made a game before, to just knock it out of the park with such a tremendous game.

                  To me, what I'm most excited about when I think about Scarlett... I love the specs, I love new hardware... I can't stop playing with your voice recorder... (edit: he really couldn't) So I do just love the raw technology, but what I really love is the art and seeing independent developers have full creative control and be free from some of the traditional constraints of video game development.



                  Have you spoken to any indie devs yet about their ideas for Scarlett?

                  Chris Charla: Not as such - we haven't gone out and said "these are the specs, make something", because we see our role as just telling people what's there, what's available. Because most independent developers are relatively small, they typically don't have research departments or that kind of thing.

                  We see a lot of sales data and marketing data, so when we do confidential developer conferences, one of the things we do is present that data to developers, in an aggregated and non-identifiable way, so they can make smart market decisions or at least understand where the market's going, or where we see the market going. We do that so developers are armed with information, and the same is true with any new technological or corporate information, something like Game Pass - developers know exactly what's coming up. We want them to know where we see the opportunities, and then we're also really clear to say "if you want to ignore everything we just said, that's cool too."

                  I do lots of talks with developers at private dev events, and I'll say "look, I'm going to talk today about how we can sell more video games, and how you can present your game best in the marketplace", but we're always clear to caveat by saying "our interests and your interests overlap really neatly in terms of selling copies and making sure consumers can discover and learn about your game".

                  But there's so many other reasons to make a video game - creative reasons, artistic reasons, personal reasons - and everybody defines success differently. So we try to make that very clear while we present all this information. For example, we'll tell devs the best day to ship is on Friday because then that's a new release over the weekend... but if you want to ignore that, do whatever you want. We're not going to love the game any less, we're not going to support the game any less. When we're looking for games that we want to feature and promote, we're not looking at what's going to sell the best, we're looking at 'what's going to be really exciting? What's going to be interesting? What's going to increase the diverse tapestry of games that are available on the platform?

                  I guess that feeds quite well into my next question, which is about subscription services and how the games market is changing. There's a worry people won't spend money immediately on an indie if they believe it will later become available on a subscription pass, and that the indie dev will then get a smaller amount of money when it's actually on the pass. What are the financial considerations here?

                  Chris Charla: I'll caveat it first by saying we don't get into the specific financial agreements, but I can tell you a couple of things. Something that's been a guiding principle since we first started doing Game Pass and working with the Game Pass team - we don't ever want a developer to be in a worse position because they worked with us on Game Pass than if they had not done that. So that is a key tenet for us in the program.

                  I have heard from some people having questions, and asking 'is this going to hurt my game if I go into Game Pass', and actually I think it's the exact opposite. What we've seen is that folks who are in Game Pass, they spend more time playing games, they play more games, they even buy more games, and that's not just games that are in Game Pass - that's games that are outside of Game Pass.

                  The really exciting thing for independent developers is that while Game Pass is a great way for players to find their next favourite game, it's also a really great way for developers to find their audiences. Over and over again we hear from devs that discovery and curation are some of the biggest challenges for independent developers today, when we feature a game in Game Pass, that gives an opportunity for millions of people to play that game, and to discover that game, to talk about that game, and it gives a developer an opportunity to have their game seen and experienced. We've seen situations where players will download games in genres we know they've never downloaded a game in that genre before. Play that game, and then go on to purchase games in that genre. So I actually think, for independent developers, Game Pass has been a really great opportunity to find an audience and get people playing the game.

                  It's really interesting - when we were first doing Game Pass we talked through all these things, as you can imagine as a major new program - 'what could it do, would this happen, would that happen'. We had a pretty good idea what was going to happen, but naturally people were worried. It was pretty gratifying to see it's ended up being a really great win-win for players and developers to have these games on Game Pass.



                  A more general question is whether you think consolidation and acquiring indies stifles innovation compared to having them on the ID@Xbox program?

                  Chris Charla: That's a hard question to answer. One of the things that is important for Microsoft, generally, is that developers have a great path getting their games onto Xbox, and in the nicest way we don't mind what that path is. So we have plenty of games that come in as ID@Xbox games or self-published, and three or four months into development, we get an email saying 'oh actually now I'm working with this publisher, I'd like to assign publishing rights to this micro-publisher' who's maybe also an ID@Xbox partner.

                  Then we also have [situations] where games come into ID and chime with Private Division, or Activision, and then move into the third party publishing realm. We also have games that come into ID as independent games, and then that development studio does a deal with Microsoft and all of a sudden it's a first party game.

                  From my perspective, and I think from the larger Xbox perspective, that's all cool - the thing that's important is to make it easier for developers to get in, so that players can play those games, and the specific relationship that the game goes through before it ships, is really up to the developer - and we're cool anyway, we've had every situation you can imagine coming through ID, we just try to be really flexible about it.

                  The argument someone presented in a piece the other day was that when a big company buys a studio, there's suddenly extra requirements for them such as publisher deadlines - do you think this stops developers being weird and creative with their ideas?

                  Chris Charla: This is a better question for one of the studios that we've acquired, but I think what you find is that studios wouldn't agree to get acquired if they thought their culture was going to have to change dramatically or everything that they loved about making games was suddenly going to go away. Tim joked onstage 'let us know if you want us to work on Excel', and it was clearly a joke, we don't want to have a closer relationship with Double Fine because we want Tim Schafer to work on Excel, we just want Double Fine to be Double Fine. So again, it's a better question for the studios, but we want Ninja Theory to be Ninja Theory.

                  This time last year, GamesIndustry.biz did a survey which suggested Xbox was the least popular platform amongst indie devs to develop for. I was wondering what you think those reasons are, and what you've been doing over the past year to work on that?

                  We can't control what developers do, all we can do is focus on ourselves, so we talk to developers all the time. I mentioned earlier that our north star is 'making life easy for developers': I think developers have seen tremendous success - both financial success and creative success on Xbox, and we're always listening to them about how we can make the process easier.



                  Where do you stand on the debate over curation: for instance, keeping a narrow selection of indies versus broadening choice on a platform?

                  Chris Charla: Xbox is an open platform, so anyone can ship a game onto Xbox, and it can go at a lot of different levels: you can be a first party studio, you could be a third party studio, you could come in through ID, and then we have the Xbox Creators Program, which lets anyone ship a game onto the platform.

                  With Creators Program, because that is completely open, we put those games in a special section of the store. For us, consumer empowerment is really important, and it's important for consumers to know these games haven't been curated, they might have different levels of polish, and consumers should know that before they dive in. Other than that, games on Xbox go through concept approval to make sure they're appropriate for a console audience as well as certain bars on console quality.

                  Ultimately, whether a game is good or bad is something that's going to be determined by players and by the market, but when I do think about curation, I think it's a big reason for the success of Xbox Game Pass - we've worked really hard to curate a collection of 100+ games that are all really solid titles. You may not like every individual title, but I think you can be confident when you're downloading a game on Game Pass, you're downloading a good video game. So it's been exciting to see how that has created an atmosphere where - for people like me, I'm a little bit older, I'm in my 40s - it gives me the freedom to download and try a ton of different games. It brings back that feeling for me, when I was a kid (I'm going to date myself, hardcore) at the video store renting console games, and the freedom to try loads of stuff and the novelty of discovery, without having to make this huge investment.

                  And because game pass is about $15 (£11.84) a month with Ultimate, it's a pretty fair investment, it gives you access to an enormous amount of high quality curated content and it really does give you that freedom to try lots of different things and find something you love.



                  Finally, which of the indies that got announced at the briefing are you most excited about?

                  Chris Charla:
                  One of my favourite moments of the conference was that transition from Keanu Reeves to Spiritfarer, because it was going from this hardcore heavy metal track to a ballad, and when you're making a mixtape (I'm dating myself) or DJ-ing, sometimes you just want to completely change the tone of the music, and that's sort of what we did with that transition and I really loved it.

                  I'll also say that I typically try not to play games until they're shipped, as I want to just experience them when they're done. I don't like cheating and playing them early. With 12 Minutes I cheated and played a really early version that was fully playable. The gameplay is amazing, the puzzle elements are really well done, the time loops up so you're not constantly doing the same thing but you're always progressing. The emotional impact the game had... I've played plenty of video games and cried at certain points, but I've never played a game and literally had to step away, turn off my computer, and go outside for a walk. It was extremely impactful to me emotionally, I don't know why but that game really hit me - so I'm really excited about that one.




                  https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2...microsoft-exec

                  :)

                  Comment


                  • Blaze_ATX
                    Editing a comment
                    Do indie devs have dev kits yet for Project Scarlett? Or is it too early for that?


                    Chris Charla: I don't think we're talking about dev kit availability right now. I apologise, I can't really amplify anything that was said about Scarlett more than what Phil talked about onstage.



                    Do current indies need to do anything to get their games ready for back compat for Scarlett?


                    Chris Charla: No - one of the things about back compat is it just works. Phil said onstage that every game that plays on Xbox One is going to play on Scarlett, and so we're super excited for that.



                    What are you looking forward to, in terms of the opportunities offered by Project Scarlett?


                    Chris Charla: When we're looking at the hardware capabilities, it's really exciting, and I'm really excited about ray tracing - not just for graphics, but for the other things you can do with ray tracing like using ray tracing for collision, and even audio.


                    😎

                    :)

                  • kssxs
                    Editing a comment
                    Basically... the RT HW inside of Anaconda is capable of more than just graphics RT... we really are going to get something special... :D

                  • Direct X-Static
                    Editing a comment
                    Yep. Ray tracing on Scarlett is top notch, including "next gen audio" like PS5 has.

                  • OrionWolf
                    Editing a comment
                    "not just for graphics, but for the other things you can do with ray tracing like using ray tracing for collision, and even audio."

                    "one of the things we do is present that data to developers, in an aggregated and non-identifiable way"

                    Hey Andrew about that dev friend of yours, you sure he knows anything about Scarlett or are those just his hopes, you know the ps5 being more powerful ¯\_(ツ)_/ ¯

                • Gears 5 Character Spotlight: Lahni



                  :)

                  Comment


                  • Guys, can I get some votes over here, please (just submit a comment in support :) ): http://misterxmedia.com/forum/non-ga...e-on-this-site

                    Thanks in advance!

                    Comment


                  • Google Stadia's Data Cap Challenge Will Be Solved By ISPs, Says Phil Harrison

                    Asking a lot.

                    Phil Harrison, vice president and general manager of Google, has indicated that he doesn't believe data caps represent a major challenge to Stadia, the company's upcoming video game streaming service. In an interview, Harrison was asked by GameSpot how much of a limiting factor he sees data caps as. "Data caps [are] not a universal challenge," he replied, going on to say he believes that ISPs will react to demand in order to fulfill the needs of their customers.

                    "The ISPs have a strong history of staying ahead of consumer trend and if you look at the history of data caps in those small number of markets--and it’s actually a relatively small number of markets that have [data caps]--the trend over time, when music streaming and download became popular, especially in the early days when it was not necessarily legitimate, data caps moved up. Then with the evolution of TV and film streaming, data caps moved up, and we expect that will continue to be the case."

                    Placing faith in ISPs to respond to the demands of a streaming service like Stadia, which sends 1080p or 4K video feeds to players, depending on the package they're subscribed to, presents further questions. The first being, would the adoption of Stadia be widespread enough to signal a trend that ISPs need to respond to, in the same way that music, TV, and movie streaming did.

                    Harrison stuck to his guns when presented with this concern, saying he believes "ISPs are smart [and] they understand that they’re in the business of keeping customers happy and keeping customers with them for a long time."

                    On the suggestion that ISPs may instead see this as an opportunity to attach further costs to having more data, which in turn would become a greater expense on the user, Harrison noted that 5G technology would be one part of the solution.

                    "There’s a very interesting additional dynamic happening in the internet market, which is the evolution of 5G, particularly in what’s called fixed wireless, which is not necessarily running 5G on your phone but as a way of bringing 5G into your home. All of the 5G fixed wireless businesses that are up now that I’m aware of have no data caps and are very very high performance, so that’s introducing a competitive dynamic. $50 a month. That’s what Verizon fixed wireless costs is for minimum 300mb/s and up to a gigabit. It’s pretty good value to me."

                    Harrison also noted that many of the calculations that are being used to illustrate how quickly streaming at high resolution can burn through an allotment of data aren't necessarily correct.

                    "I’ve seen the math calculations that people have done. If you take 35mb/s, it’s not always 35mb/s because we use compression. There will be sometimes when actually it’s using significantly less data than that, so it’s not correct to multiply 35 mbp/s by the number of seconds that you play."

                    Harrison is are aware that Stadia is nevertheless a demanding service and, as a result, it will "give players information about what they’re using and how they can change their resolution if they want to."

                    Early adopters will get access to Google Stadia in November 2019 with the Founder's Edition, which is available for pre-order right now, directly from Google. Everyone else will have to wait until the Base version launches in 2020. When the Base version launches, it will be available as a free option, but people will be able to buy a Stadia controller and then purchase games a la carte to stream from anywhere without any additional fees. For access to streaming at 4K, a growing library of games, and discounts on purchasing them, players will need to pay a monthly fee for Stadia Pro.

                    Prior to E3, Google held an event revealing key information about Stadia, including details on the subscription service, launch plans, and the games that will be available on the service. You can read all about that in our Google Stadia news roundup.




                    https://www.gamespot.com/articles/go.../1100-6468119/



                    :)

                    Comment


                    • Blaze_ATX
                      Editing a comment
                      HAHAHAHAHA!!! Phil Harrison is a cluless moron, if he believe this.🤣🤣🤣🤣

                      :)

                    • kssxs
                      Editing a comment
                      This tool doesn't seem to realize that ISP's will gouge where they can and that Stadia will not have a userbase large enough to force any ISP to not just try to do business as usual, and take advantage of those that destroy their data caps. Seriously... was this not covered in their business plan meetings. Do they really believe that ISP's will change their data caps for the small number of morons that sign-up for Stadia across the world? And then even in the long run?

                      And what was that about giving gamers the ability to change their resolution to manage their data usage? So now Stadia is a low-resolution service that will STILL use a bunch of data, because we, and apparently PH, knows that ISP's aren't going to change their data caps? What just happened to his argument that ISP's WILL increase their data caps? Why would gamers even need a choice of resolution? Who the hell is willing to pay for a service that is basically forcing low-res in order to be usable? He just pulled the rug out from under his whole argument to have this service in the first place. Why wouldn't I just game on my mobile locally until I got home?

                      The only place this is remotely viable is either at work on the company WiFi, or at a hotel on that WiFi. Good luck with that!

                      This, people, is failure in motion...

                    • Direct X-Static
                      Editing a comment
                      Meanwhile, you can game 2.5 times longer with xCloud because of its efficiency...

                    • OrionWolf
                      Editing a comment
                      Yeah, if that was true than ISPs would have done this for Netflix, Amazon, HBO etc. quite a while ago.

                    • BadCeeJay1975
                      Editing a comment
                      To be fair, not all countries have data caps. In the UK where I live, data caps for home broadband simply do not exist and there are plenty of affordable mobile plans with no caps. I still think that Stadia will fail hard because generally the market they are aiming at is not where their customers are. They want the hardcore gamers who happily chose to make single large transactions when in reality they should be selling to the casual mobile market who expect a very low barrier to entry model but are happy to spend significant money on lots of and smaller micro transactions.

                    • Misterx
                      Editing a comment
                      We have a cheapest Internet here. Without any caps...

                      but i don't know why i need XCloud yet. Its for kids with 4g/5g cellurars

                  • The Dark Pictures: Man of Medan : Dev Diary #3 - Who is Conrad (Part 1)



                    :)

                    Comment




                    • https://www.halowaypoint.com/en-us/n...date-june-2019

                      :)

                      Comment


                      • Halo: Reach PC 4K Playthrough | Tip of the Spear



                        :)

                        Comment


                        • Blaze_ATX
                          Editing a comment
                          Look so good, i can't wait to play it on Xbox One X in native 4K at 60fps..

                          :)

                      • Gears 5 Character Spotlight: Keegan



                        :)

                        Comment


                        • Xbox Next : Jason Ronald: Xbox Scarlett was developed to eradicate technical bottlenecks



                          The new Xbox Scarlett console will eat monster for breakfast, and especially bottlenecks and bottlenecks for developers will be eradicated.

                          At E3 2019, windowscentral's colleagues talked to Microsoft Gaming Team Lead CVP, Mike Ybarra, and Partner Director of Program Management, Jason Ronald, to tick some more interesting details about the new Project Scarlett Xbox console .

                          Ronald talked about how Scarlett was designed to eliminate bottlenecks in terms of graphics and frame rate, and to make sure that games on the Xbox Scarlett run best. "Plays best on Xbox", will be the motto of Microsoft in the next generation.
                          Jason Ronald said, "If we look at the overall design of the system, everything from the system on chip (SOC), through the memory we have, to the SSD we have built in there. It's really about eliminating all these bottlenecks so that game developers can realize their vision, and enable developers to create the best possible versions of their games. "Ybarra then pointed out that it was for the team It is very important to say "Where to play games best" .
                          At the same time you have also talked about the possible price and made it clear that you know very well what a reasonable price for a console.
                          Jason continued, "We understand the reasonable prices for a console and what customers expect from it. At the same time we are innovative, we push the limits. Today we do not share details about the price or, as you know, any more detailed specifications. But I say that we are very confident that what we are building is something that will set a new bar for the expectations of console games. "
                          Although not much is known about the new Xbox Scarlett console, but with the support of Ray Traycing, a built-SSD and other top components, the next generation of consoles will still be a costly entry. Or what do you mean?



                          https://translate.google.com.pr/tran...auszumerzen%2F

                          :)

                          Comment


                          • OrionWolf
                            Editing a comment
                            I wonder if they're going to talk more about the specs at the X019 in London?

                          • mistercteam
                            Editing a comment
                            next year they will booom
                            just like X1 reveal
                            birdie said, 50:50 chance they will also talk about X1 tech
                            as some foundry other than TSMC bit angry MS keep hidden some tech breakthrough , that can put those foundry in the good media coverage

                          • Misterx
                            Editing a comment
                            +12

                          • Direct X-Static
                            Editing a comment
                            @ Mr. C

                            That's when Lockhart will be discussed, I'm sure. 1X is almost certainly the budget "next gen" console, considering that MS announced that the 1x was an iterative console and that MS was finished with the traditional notion of console generations moving forwards.

                            Are there actually people who are angry that MS is hiding tech? Is this info from your insider or somewhere else?

                        • DF Direct! Polymega In-Depth Preview: The Ultimate Retro All-In-One Console?



                          :)

                          Comment


                          • Blaze_ATX
                            Editing a comment
                            At first i was skeptical but after watching this video am now convince and definitely buying one, really impressive.

                            :)
                            Last edited by Blaze_ATX; 06-29-2019, 03:21 PM.

                          • DutchRogers
                            Editing a comment
                            Looks incredible! Needs Dreamcast though. With it being region free my old Japanese Wrestling Games would work👍 Plus it rips (CDs, but not sure about cartridge) your games to the system so your old games can stay safe.

                          • Direct X-Static
                            Editing a comment
                            Still no N64 either... but it looks really interesting!

                          • DutchRogers
                            Editing a comment
                            Ahh damn, didn't realize no n64 yet. Hmmm. I assume it is a timing issue, certain generations aren't supported until enough time has passed or similar. Not sure. In their FAQ they indicate which consoles they have no plans on supporting. So we will see as time moves on what happens.

                        • amazing AMD CPU Zen2 benchmars...time to buy some AMD stocks...

                          MrC why AMD advanced in CPU too? Is that a result from collaboration with MS RnD too?

                          Intel are scared.

                          Comment


                          • mistercteam
                            Editing a comment
                            indeed MrX,
                            the CPU of Zen is only half of the story

                            actually CPU + Scalar processing on X1 tech to X2 will be the one moves forward and advancing more
                            even if MS will utilize this foremost for gaming 1st but probably soon also will be for datacentre

                        • New Games with Gold for July 2019



                          Welcome to another Games with Gold reveal for Xbox One and Xbox 360! In July on Xbox One, survive against all manner of threats in the mysterious Inside and then enjoy frenzied action against friends in Big Crown: Showdown. On Xbox 360, and Xbox One via Backward Compatibility, play the side-scrolling adventure classic Castlevania: Symphony of the Night and then go save the future in Meet the Robinsons.

                          All games will be available exclusively for Xbox Live Gold members for a limited time as part of Games with Gold. With Xbox Live Gold, you get the most advanced multiplayer service, free games, and exclusive member discounts on games in the Microsoft Store — get Xbox Live Gold today to get in on the action! Inside

                          Play the critically acclaimed and award-winning puzzle-platformer, Inside. Hunted and alone, take control of a young boy through creepy atmospheric environments, survive all forms of deadly traps and enemies and journey your way to the heart of a covert institute. What mysterious horror await?

                          Big Crown: Showdown

                          Your friends become your foes in Big Crown: Showdown. Compete for the crown in 4-player local or online multiplayer in three wacky worlds full of medieval shenanigans. Engage in frenzied fights and avoid perilous hazards in a fun and entertaining title for all ages.

                          Castlevania: Symphony of the Night

                          Dracula’s castle has risen again and it’s up to you to save the world from the nocturnal threat in Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. In this 2-D adventure/RPG platformer, battle the forces of evil, upgrade your armor and stats, and solve the mystery of what became of the previous hero, Richter Belmont. Solid non-linear gameplay and multiple endings make this cult classic a must-play.

                          Meet the Robinsons

                          Save the future by traveling to the past in Meet the Robinsons. Based on the animated movie, help Wilbur Robinson pursue the dastardly Bowler Hat Guy and his robotic hat, Doris, through time and thwart their evil plans. Armed with a collection of scientific gadgets, solve puzzles and battle your enemies to fix the time stream!

                          Read more about our Games with Gold program here and stay tuned to Xbox Wire for all the latest news on Xbox. Also, discover the benefits of Xbox Live Gold, plus over 100 high-quality console and PC games with Xbox Game Pass Ultimate.



                          https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2019/06/...old-july-2019/

                          :)

                          Comment


                          • #artofxbox


                            whn CPU=CPU+its assistive core (GPU Scalar),beside Main Gfxcore
                            sure you can even relate to Nick Baker,X1 architect when he said 768 Scalar
                            and where he said GPU AI,etc
                            remember X2 leak there is GPU0
                            because there is GPU1
                            even Hovis patent of 2 GPUs is fit





















                            Last edited by mistercteam; 06-30-2019, 07:47 AM.

                            Comment


                            • mistercteam
                              Editing a comment
                              twitter change how it copy paste
                              it is better the old twitter I think

                            • Direct X-Static
                              Editing a comment
                              The old insider from Live Journal kept saying that the XB1 was a dual GPU design too! I found this on the net today while searching for clues in old articles about XB1:

                              "The GPU and CPU blocks look like we expected and detailed in our Xbox One graphics preview. DirectX 11.1+ is listed as supported and the GPU stats are matched well to the prediction that this was a Bonaire-derived core. Microsoft claims a total of 15 non-CPU processing blocks, which works out to 12 for the GPU, two for audio, and an “other” possibly related to I/O or Kinect."

                              Source:https://www.extremetech.com/gaming/1...d-by-microsoft

                              The thing that caught me off guard here was that Extremetech, in addressing each of the, "15 non-CPU processing blocks", could only confirm 14 of them. What is this "other" block actually for then? Is it for I/O or Kinect, is it possibly a scalar processor? Hmm...
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