Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Main Thread & News Stream. Xbox Infinity [276]

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gears 5 (Boot Camp Mode)









    :)

    Comment


    • scottvxr
      Editing a comment
      Looks super clean😎.


  • #nextlevel
    #boom
    #untapped

    remember when 343 3-4 times reassure the focus for untapped X1 family they not trying to make a joke..

    birdie:
    "Yes the demo of Halo infinite isn't on Scarlett or PC , actually on Scorpio dev kit"











    Comment


    • banmaster
      Editing a comment
      If the Halo infinite spining on the Scorpio Dev Kit then it really didn't know what to expect from the next Gen, but wasn't it confirmed that the infinite was spinning on the Nvidia 2080 ti

    • Direct X-Static
      Editing a comment
      I knew it! The facts that the demo had no ray tracing and MS never talked about Scarlett visuals gave it away. Un-Lockhart is real, but hidden, and that's why Spencer said that they only had one console to talk about at E3. Now Brad Sams is talking about rumors of an xCloud console, which I believe is the Xbox One. It's no coincidence that there will be 3 versions of Xbox in play at the same time.

  • Wreckfest Preorder Trailer



    :)

    Comment




    • :)

      Comment


      • Phil Spencer: The mega-interview on Project Scarlett, PC Gaming and more



        Phil Spencer made an exceptional career with Microsoft: In 1988, he joined the company as a 20-year intern, since 2014, he led, among others, the Xbox and Xbox live teams and Microsoft Studios. Since 2017, he has been named executive vice president of gaming for his Xbox and PC gaming employer, with only Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella in charge.

        We talked to Phil Spencer about Microsoft's plans for consoles and PCs at Los Angeles's E3 2019, emulating previous generations of consoles, why Xbox and Windows PC remain separate systems, and why an SSD at a game console is responsible for more than just faster loading is.

        Phil Spencer: Well, how did you like our press conference?

        PC Games Hardware: Great! But where Sony was not there: Why did you present no less than the 60 games shown, but in more detail, with more gameplay instead of render movies and trailers?

        Phil Spencer: Funnily, our goal was not to show as many games as possible. We considered which topics we would like to cover at the press conference. The Game Pass was a big topic, first-party games were another - 14 in-house developments, twelve of which will be released next year, there have never been so many. Then there are PC games, keyword PC Game Pass, then xCloud and Scarlett.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: And the new Elite Controller ...

        Phil Spencer: ... and the new Elite controller, right. A lot of content. Add to that many topics that people want to see more about - Age of Empires 4. And many more we have not even talked about yet. For example, what our Studio The Initiative is doing right now. Or the second team of Playground Games (Forza). What are Rare, Turn 10 and Compulsion? But when a press conference lasts more than 90 minutes, people get a bit worried.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: Okay, nobody can blame you for a lack of content. But to get back to the point gameplay instead of trailer ...

        Phil Spencer: We opened with Outer Worlds - Gameplay. Second Game: Bleeding Edge - Gameplay, followed by Ori - Gameplay. Game Number Four: Minecraft Dungeons - Gameplay. Halo? Well, that will not happen until 2020. And sure, personally I would have liked to see gameplay of all games.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: At previous E3 events, developers were on stage to play live.

        Phil Spencer: But usually not 18 months before release! And now without entering into a debate with the Internet: The fans wanted to see gameplay of Gears 5. But because Rod Fergusson (studio chief of developer The Coalition) did not play a campaign on stage, they say there was no gameplay?

        Anyway, people on stage? At home in the stream, the vast majority of viewers only see the screen-filling game anyway. This does not mean that it is not good feedback that players want to see something of the campaign of a game that appears three months after the E3. I understand that completely.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: Before we forget it: Hurray for the Flight Simulator!

        Phil Spencer: Yeah! And how great did he look like? Two petabytes of big map material assembled over the Azure AI. And that was also gameplay!


        "The new Flight Simulator will be the game, with which you can bring a new graphics card to its limits as before."


        ➤ PC Games Hardware: When did you decide to have him removed ?

        Phil Spencer: My colleague Shannon Loftis and Matt Booty had been buzzing the idea for a couple of years. With an external developer named Sobo, we then considered whether and how we could combine the Bing maps with current weather data in real time. I'm not a pilot myself, but Flight Simulator was the game that brought a new graphics card to its limits. And with the new version we wanted to do that once more.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: Many of our readers are already getting their aircraft controllers from the attic ...

        Phil Spencer: We would not have imagined that the Flight Simulator would be celebrating its premiere at an E3 press conference. But it was perfect: We announce the PC Game Pass and the Game Pass Ultimate, followed by the Trio Flight Simulator, Age of Empires 2 and Wasteland 3. A sign that we are reaping the trust of PC gamers and the PC Really want to show community that we're not just porting console titles to the pc.


        "We really want to show the PC community that we are not just porting console titles to the PC."


        ➤ PC Games Hardware: Keyword Emulation: The team at Microsoft responsible for emulating Xbox and Xbox 360 games for the Xbox One is already in the making of Xbox One games ready for its successor, Scarlett , Would not it be great to get compatibility with more than just a previous generation?

        Phil Spencer: The cool thing about the Xbox One compatibility of previous titles is that the games not only run, but also better. We're not talking about it that often, but the fact is, future hardware will make earlier-generation games look better and play better. We have seen this on the PC for quite some time, but bringing something to the console storage was a real sense of achievement. For example, there was recently 4K support for Xbox 360 games like cameo.

        For Project Scarlett's design, we've made sure that games emulated today on the Xbox One will continue to work in the future. In other words, Xbox and Xbox 360 titles running on an Xbox One today also work on Scarlett. And our goal is that all Xbox One games are playable on Scarlett as well. Oh, and your Xbox One or Elite controllers will work with the next generation too.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: That would mean that Project Scarlett's announced quad performance could be used to make even Xbox One titles look better?

        Phil Spencer: That's where you hit the nail on the head - that's why we want the team working on the Xbox One to do it with Scarlett. Because its members are not satisfied when an old game runs on a new console - but ask each title: Can we build the best possible version? They did not do that for all 360 games, and sometimes they had to work overtime to get them at the same frame rate. Compatibility is not an easy task, but I'm convinced we have the best compatibility team in the world.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: You may say that a little more loudly, because for many players this is an important decision criterion.

        Phil Spencer: Sure. That's a bit like xCloud. I hear from some journalists that I did not say enough about it on stage. But my point is, I've been showing enough videos, now is the time to put it in people's hands so they can write about their experiences. Also questions like "What bandwidth do I need?" and so on - they are beautiful and good. But if someone has tried xCloud and flashed the experience, then he will say, "I really want that, what do I have to do for it?"

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: Back to Project Scarlett: If we look at the hardware, your next console looks like a modern high-end PC. At the same time, Microsoft is using Windows 10 and the Xbox OS double-tracked. Would not it make sense to summarize the two?

        Phil Spencer: Unlike the Xbox OS, Windows 10 needs to cover countless features and applications. Nobody will connect a ten-year-old printer to his Xbox via USB and expect them to talk to each other. However, one huge part of the task of the Windows team is to make sure legacy hardware and software are supported. But we do not have to support an Xbox console the same way. Sure, games have to run, but dot matrix printers and plotters? (laughs) We cleaned up this program code superstructure on the Xbox, even if we share some things with Windows.


        "The ability to directly provide CPU and GPU with data through the SSD will enable the creation of game worlds that will not only be richer, but also more seamless."


        ➤ PC Games Hardware: That's what my question was about: A developer who develops for PC and Xbox is happy if he can use the same APIs and does not have to invent the wheel twice.

        Phil Spencer: This is our long-term goal, a project called GameCore. If a developer programs Win32 games today, he will find the API interface of our next SDK very familiar, allowing him to keep as many program lines as possible on both platforms. This is of course different from the OS instantiating the APIs, for example, we do not have to worry about enterprise features.

        GameCore beats the trail to the origin of the Xbox name: The console was called that because it sits on DirectX and facilitates the development of games, if you can already program for the PC. Over time, both platforms have moved a little bit apart, but with GameCore we have a chance to bring them closer together again.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: By default, Project Scarlett will have an SSD. This ensures as with the PC for shorter load times, no question. But how could game developers use that for their titles? For PCs, they can not build on it automatically, because in some cases even traditional hard drives stuck.

        Phil Spencer: Thanks to their speed, developers can now practically use the SSD as Virtual RAM. The access times of the SSD approach the memory access times of the current generation of consoles. Of course, the OS has to allow the developers appropriate access that goes beyond that of a pure storage medium. But then we will see how the address space will increase immensely - comparable to the change from Win16 to Win32 or in some cases Win64.
        Of course, the SSD will still be slower than the GDDR6 RAM sitting directly on the die. But the ability to directly supply CPU and GPU via the SSD will allow for the creation of game worlds that will not only be richer, but more seamless as well. Not only in terms of pure loading times, but also in terrain mapping. A graphic designer no longer has to worry about when GDDR6 ends and when the SSD starts. I like the fact that Mark Cerny and his team are also investing in an SSD at Sony for the PlayStation 5 ...





        ➤ PC Games Hardware: ... the manufacturers of multiplatform games, too.

        Phil Spencer: That's right! And the engines and tools can implement appropriate functions. Together, we will provide a larger installed base - and developers will do their utmost to master and support the programming of these hardware capabilities. While I do not have a PS5 development kit, I do not think our Minecraft team even has that. But it will be exciting to see how the industry will benefit from the overarching deployment of such solutions.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: Does the already mentioned statement 4x relate to the performance of the complete console?

        Phil Spencer: No, that's a pure CPU statement. It would also be a little too simplistic to refer to the whole system, as much as I would like to, because so many components flow into it. Take the Xbox One X: In its development, the memory bandwidth was the bottleneck. It had to be big enough to provide content to the GPU without idle time. We could have brought the console to market a year earlier, but we waited another year to get all 6 of the GPU's TFLOPS up and running.

        Our primary goal with Scarlett was to improve the graphics capabilities and GPU of the console. Primarily because another goal was to integrate a CPU into the system that can compete with the GPU. Unlike PCs, consoles have historically been "arm-presses" with a strong arm - the GPU - and a weak arm - the CPU, which does nothing other than change frames calculated by the GPU as fast as possible, often with only a maximum of 30 fps.


        "Our primary goal with Scarlett was to improve the graphics capabilities and GPU of the console."


        Now we are talking about 120 Hertz or variable refresh rates. Because if the timing of the game loop - the core routines of a game - corresponds to the refresh rate, this reduces the input latency and thus ensures a smooth gaming experience. And that depends largely on the CPU and memory bandwidth. That's why you have to see a statement like "Scarlett is x times faster than Xbox One X" a bit more differentiated.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: On a console, I can not run benchmarks very well and then compare Xbox 360, Xbox One X and Scarlett. Motto: If I overclock this core a bit, my console creates a few more frames per second.

        Phil Spencer: That would be something, 3D Bench on the consoles. (laughs) But that's why we're on the PC. I love it when people put heart and soul into perfecting their gaming experience. For example, my gaming laptop still runs at 1080p, because a good frame rate is very important to me. I do not need a 4K screen. But that's just my personal taste. And sure, we support Scarlett 8K graphics, but we're not telling any developer to only make games with 8K graphics or only 4K graphics.

        ➤ PC Games Hardware: Who has an 8K TV at home today?

        Phil Spencer: Exactly. Scarlett supports 120 Hertz or variable refresh rates and 8K. But will we see games in 120 Hertz with 8K resolution? Sure, that would work, but then you have to do without other things while playing. Our job is to give the developers a range of tools and choices for players.
        For example, if you have a 1080p TV today, the games look better on an Xbox One X connected to it, and super-sampling and co. But if you do not need it, you can buy an Xbox One S and save a few hundred dollars.



        ➤ PC Games Hardware: Funny, by the way, right before the Microsoft press conference, Intel ran its own press event, one of which was to continue producing the fastest CPU. But in all current consoles are chips from AMD.

        Phil Spencer: Lisa Su and her AMD team did a great job. You play in a league above your own weight class, looking at market shares and stock price. And their chips are the backbone of Google's cloud - and they're in the near consoles of Sony and us.

        I'm not saying anything against Intel and Nvidia - it's just amazing how AMD has held its own in the last five or six years. And it's good for everyone when several competitors spur each other on to innovation and excellence.

        PC Games Hardware: Phil, thank you for the interesting conversation!






        https://translate.google.com.pr/tran...iew-1293543%2F

        :)

        Comment


        • Blaze_ATX
          Editing a comment
          Quotes:

          "PC Games Hardware: Project Scarlett will have an SSD by default. This ensures as on the PC shorter load times, no question.
          But how could game developers use that for their titles? For PCs they can not build on it automatically, because in some PCs traditional hard drives are still present.


          Phil Spencer: Thanks to its speed developers can now practically use the SSD as Virtual RAM. The access times of the SSD approach the memory access times of the current generation of consoles. Of course, the OS has to allow the developers appropriate access that goes beyond that of a pure storage medium. But then we will see how the address space will increase immensely - comparable to the change from Win16 to Win32 or in some cases Win64.


          Of course, the SSD will still be slower than the GDDR6 RAM sitting directly on the die. But the ability to directly supply CPU and GPU via the SSD will allow for the creation of game worlds that will not only be richer, but more seamless as well. Not only in terms of pure loading times, but also in terrain mapping. A graphic designer no longer has to worry about when GDDR6 ends and when the SSD starts. I like the fact that Mark Cerny and his team are also investing in an SSD at Sony for the PlayStation 5 ...


          PC Games Hardware: ... the manufacturers of multiplatform games, too.


          Phil Spencer: That's right! And the engines and tools can implement appropriate functions. Together, we will provide a larger install base - and developers will do their utmost to master and support the programming of these hardware capabilities. While I do not have a PS5 development kit, I do not think our Minecraft team even has that. But it will be exciting to see how the industry will benefit from the overarching deployment of such solutions.


          PC Games Hardware: Does the statement of 4x times faster performance apply to the whole console?


          Phil Spencer: No, that's a pure CPU statement. It would also be a little too simplistic to refer to the whole system, as much as I would like to, because so many components flow into it. Take the Xbox One X: In its development, the memory bandwidth was the bottleneck. It had to be big enough to provide content to the GPU without idle time. We could have brought the console to market a year earlier, but we waited another year to get all 6 of the GPU's TFLOPS up and running.


          Our primary goal with Scarlett was to improve the graphics capabilities and GPU of the console. Primarily because another goal was to integrate a CPU into the system that can keep up with the GPU. Unlike PCs, consoles have historically been "arm-wrestlers" with a strong arm - the GPU - and a weak arm - the CPU, which does nothing other than changing the frames which got calculated by the GPU as fast as possible, often with only a maximum of 30 fps.


          Now we are talking about 120 Hertz or variable refresh rates. Because if the timing of the game loop - the core routines of a game - corresponds to the refresh rate, this reduces the input latency and thus ensures a smooth gaming experience. And that depends largely on the CPU and memory bandwidth. That's why you have to see a statement like "Scarlett is x times faster than Xbox One X" a bit more differentiated.


          PC Games Hardware: Incidentally, just before the Microsoft press conference, Intel ran its own press event, one of which was that they still produce the fastest CPU. But in all current consoles are chips from AMD.


          Phil Spencer: Lisa Su and her team at AMD did a great job. They play in a league above their own weight class, looking at market shares and stock price. And their chips are the backbone of Google's cloud - and they're in the upcoming console from Sony and us.


          I'm not saying anything against Intel and Nvidia - it's just amazing how AMD has held its own in the last five or six years. And it's good for everyone when several competitors spur each other on to innovation and excellence."


          :)

        • Direct X-Static
          Editing a comment
          "PC Games Hardware: Does the already mentioned statement 4x relate to the performance of the complete console?"

          "Phil Spencer: No, that's a pure CPU statement... Our primary goal with Scarlett was to improve the graphics capabilities and GPU of the console. Primarily because another goal was to integrate a CPU into the system that can compete with the GPU."

          So the CPU is 4x that of Scorpio, but the GPU was still their main focus! Since the CPU was designed to balance with the GPU, what can we infer about GPU performance?

          I think it eats monsters for breakfast...

      • Coming Soon to Xbox Game Pass: Middle-earth: Shadow of War, Dead Rising 4, and More



        Hey, Xbox Game Pass members! If you didn’t catch them on Twitter, it’s time for our IRL patch notes. Updates include: A major buff for The Sun. There is a new debuff: Sunburn, where overexposure to The Sun will cause damage over time and limited mobility. A new item has been added named Sunscreen that gives you a temporary resistance to Sunburn. The seasonal event Vacation was added, giving players a significant stress resistance when applied. New items have been added in the tailor shops like Swim Trunks and Sleeveless Cloth Armor. Lastly, Grilled Meat is more readily available at vendors.

        Games Coming to Xbox Game Pass

        July 4
        • Middle-earth: Shadow of War (Xbox Game Pass for Console, Xbox Game Pass for PC, Xbox Game Pass Ultimate)
        • My Time at Portia (Xbox Game Pass for Console, Xbox Game Pass for PC, Xbox Game Pass Ultimate)
        • Undertale (Xbox Game Pass for PC, Xbox Game Pass Ultimate)
        July 11
        • Blazing Chrome (Xbox Game Pass for Console, Xbox Game Pass for PC, Xbox Game Pass Ultimate)
        • Dead Rising 4 (Xbox Game Pass for Console, Xbox Game Pass for PC, Xbox Game Pass Ultimate)
        • LEGO City Undercover (Xbox Game Pass for Console, Xbox Game Pass Ultimate)
        • Timespinner (Xbox Game Pass for PC, Xbox Game Pass Ultimate)
        • Unavowed (Xbox Game Pass for PC, Xbox Game Pass Ultimate)
        On top of all those games, you can be among the first to play the new Gears 5 Versus mode this month during the Gears 5 Tech Test. All current Xbox Game Pass members get access, with no preorder required! If you’re not a member yet, you can snag your first month of Xbox Game Pass Ultimate for just one buck. That’s right, just $1.

        We add new games all the time, but to keep the library curated and fresh for you, we do have to let some beloved titles go. Now’s your chance to get in some playtime before they leave this month! Or, if you love them too much to part with, don’t forget you can use your Xbox Game Pass member discount to buy them at up to 20% off before they go.

        Games Leaving Xbox Game Pass for Console
        • Aftercharge (July 9)
        • Warhammer Vermintide 2 (July 10)
        • LEGO Movie: The Videogame (July 16)
        • Dandara (July 31)
        • Dead Rising 2 (July 31)
        • Hitman Season 1 (July 31)
        • Metal Slug XX (July 31)
        • Defense Grid: The Awakening (July 31)
        • Hexic 2 (July 31)
        • Iron Brigade (July 31)
        Xbox Game Pass Quests

        While we anxiously await the big announcement of when exactly the Gears 5 Tech Test will be playable, check out our Xbox Game Pass Quests for July. Earn more than 1,500 Microsoft Rewards points in the games you love including Monster Hunter: World, Hollow Knight, Forza Horizon 4, LEGO Batman and many, many more. And that’s not all. Score a killer prize by completing as many Xbox Game Pass Quests as possible by July 31. Each quest gives you 10 entries for a chance to win one of these amazing prizes:
        • Trip for two to Paris, France for Paris Games Week 2019 (1 prize)
        • Alienware Gaming Rig (2 prizes)
        • Razer Turret Keyboard and Mouse (10 prizes)
        • Xbox Elite Controller (30 prizes)
        Wait, Don’t Forget This Part

        My last reminder is to stay on top of all these games and other Xbox Game Pass tidbits, you should download the Xbox App for PC, as well as the Xbox Game Pass mobile app, where you can easily download games to your console while you’re out. For more memes, follow us on Twitter and Instagram, and for news about PC gaming, follow our new PC Twitter handle @XboxGamePassPC. And of course, stay tuned here to Xbox Wire for all the latest and greatest Xbox news.




        https://news.xbox.com/en-us/2019/07/...ass-july-2019/

        :)

        Comment


        • hasmeh
          Editing a comment
          Great selection of games being added to the GP. I will try the strategy games on my trusty Surface.

      • xCloud Yarnell and Anthem (Brad Sams New Video)



        :)

        Comment


        • World War Waz - The Six Skulls Update



          :)

          Comment


          • #toomanysecrets #artofxbox
            #boom
            #unlock










































            1




            Comment


            • Metal Wolf Chaos XD - Gameplay Trailer



              :)

              Comment


              • The Outer Worlds team talks Microsoft acquisition, Fallout influences, and RPG choice

                The Outer Worlds aims to be a boundless RPG, putting player choice front and center.



                With intergalactic conglomerates and kingpins, the hyper-corporatist Halcyon colony is rife with distrust and conspiracy. It's the canvas for the upcoming role-playing game (RPG) The Outer Worlds, a return to sci-fi roots for Obsidian Entertainment, famed for Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic II and Fallout: New Vegas. While a welcome return to exploration and action, this fresh endeavor also takes player freedom to the next level.

                From its ambitious RPG unveiling to its recent acquisition by Microsoft, it's been a busy year for Obsidian. We caught up with the studio at E3 2019 for a glimpse at the journey so far, and what lies ahead.

                In The Outer Worlds, choice is the recipe for success



                Choice lays at the heart of The Outer Worlds, helping define its deep role-playing systems. Crafting your alternate identity is intrinsic to the genre, and where Obsidian looks to build a world with player freedom and tangible consequences. Complex and intertwined systems pave these underpinnings, with opportunities to fork its narrative throughout the game.

                Our demo kicked off with a glimpse of Fallbrook, a wild town host to smugglers and opportunist crooks. Tasked with infiltrating a "boarst" factory, we confront the founder of the twisted facility breeding mutated "cystipig" meat. Events unfold in response to your actions, with character interactions and choices skewing the quest's outcome. We sat down with Dan McPhee, narrative designer on The Outer Worlds, to expand on the scale of player impact and how the scale of decisions will vary.


                "[It's] a tangled nest of options and reactivity. The payoff is you get to do whatever you want."


                "We have a wide range," McPhee said. "Everything we put in the game is based on someone asking somewhere, 'What if the player can do X, Y, and Z?' We have the small things like quests, who you can take with you. You can change your options on any given quest. And then we have larger, overarching things. There are factions in the game, and they butt heads. And then you can choose sides, or you can try to get them to work together, or you can play them off each other. Iff you pursue the quest lines that those factions are involved with, it eventually becomes this massive, dramatic struggle."



                Adopting a traditional linear format allows for curation and guidance, both valuable tools in digital storytelling. However, The Outer Worlds aims to embrace an identity of branching gameplay while battling its hurdles to ensure a refined experience. Positioned among Obsidian's storytelling stars, McPhee details the challenges in assembling a compelling narrative for this fresh IP. "It's difficult, it's a lot of work," McPhee said. "At a very basic level, one of the things that we have to keep in the back of our mind when we're doing things like quests and NPCs is [that] you can kill anybody. If you have a quest-giver, we try very hard to not let the player shoot themselves in the foot. And killing a person is a choice."

                The ambition is crafted quests that accommodate for player freedom while considering fail-safes, according to McPhee. Implementing these countermeasures has taken time, but avoids punishing those breaking away from norms. "We were doing play tests in the office, and one of my coworkers did one where she very specifically tried to break the game. She wanted to try really hard and she couldn't do it. That's just a result of constant iteration of work over the past couple years."



                The Outer World's embrace of unhinged corporatism fosters a turbulent backdrop, pushing combat as a central pillar of its role-playing foundations. Its deep role-playing systems complement shooting and looting, leaning on familiar tropes to Bethesda's Fallout series. The Outer Worlds looks to cater to both shooter fans and role-playing purists, providing options to approach encounters with strategy or a real-time focus.

                "There are other things like slow down with tactical time dilation," McPhee said, a dedicated ability to slow down time during combat. In clear inspiration from the turn-based V.A.T.S. targeting system of modern Fallout titles, the ability alleviates the granular, reactive gunplay, with an option of further upgrade paths too. "That actually helps a lot. Depending on the choices that you make during your character creation, customization, and all that stuff, you can potentially have that be very powerful."

                The Microsoft family and Game Pass puzzle



                While already a proven role-playing heavyweight, Obsidian now falls among Microsoft's extensive list of recent acquisitions under the Xbox Game Studios family. Obsidian's 2018 onboarding further fortified in-house Xbox development, providing the studio with long-needed backing of an industry giant. "They've been great, honestly," said McPhee on the acquisition. "It's not something that directly affects this specific project, but just the general atmosphere has been awesome."


                "The general atmosphere has been awesome"


                Sided by over a dozen Xbox Game Studios development teams, the benefits of cross-studio resources and collaboration already bear fruit for the team. "It comes at the tail end of this project, but we're already talking, we catch up with the sister studios, talking about different techniques and learn from them and stuff like that." Fellow role-playing icons inXile Entertainment sit among those partners, currently committed to Wasteland 3 and Bard's Tale IV support.



                Over three years deep into The Outer Worlds, publishing rights remain with Take-Two label Private Division, despite Microsoft's recent acquisition. However, it will make the year's Xbox Game Pass blockbusters, expanding the growing Netflix-style subscription library in 2019. Established on Xbox One and now extending to Windows 10 PCs, Xbox Game Pass serves a roster of over 100 titles, alongside first-party games at launch. The Outer Worlds joins upon its October 25, 2019, release, granting access under the $10 monthly fee.

                "I really like Game Pass, and one of the things I like about it is that I tend to try games I probably wouldn't try without it," McPhee said. "And I think a lot of people are going to do that." With day-one inclusion, McPhee emphasizes Xbox Game Pass will aid in drawing new players to its role-playing adventure. "We have a core audience for The Outer Worlds that's going to get the game. They're really excited about it. [...] but I think there are going to be a lot of people, especially on Game Pass, who just see it and go, 'Oh, that looks kind of interesting.' And maybe they wouldn't have bought it before, but now they're going to play."

                With development set to wind down over the coming months, The Outer Worlds is slated for an October 25, 2019, release on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and Windows PCs. The Outer Worlds preorders start at $60, while Xbox Game Pass on Xbox and PC serves up the game for $10 monthly, alongside over 100 accompanying titles.



                https://www.windowscentral.com/outer...recipe-success

                :)
                Last edited by Blaze_ATX; 07-03-2019, 06:50 PM.

                Comment



                • put the other story of Xbox One Beta tested block #kryptos
                  #soon
                  Fabbed at Glofo
                  Combine TSMC+Glofo
                  answer -->W2W,=bleeding edge tech
                  reason you only sees CPU part (MainSOC) which is TSMC

                  all slide proof of it
                  no lies from Linkedin
                  sl1=major clue, no TSMC Fab at Austin/SG


















                  Comment





                  • This has captures of the 50 year anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. 50k union and confederates came back to commemorate the battle. It took place for 3 days(I think it was the 3rd when it started and went to the 6th).

                    Off topic, but I saw this on my daily bing points gathering and thought some might find it kind of cool. How cool would it have been to be there and talk to some of those guys that long after the battle? So much changed since they were there fighting that it even in 1913 it would've seemed like going back even further in time than it was.
                    Last edited by angryguy77; 07-03-2019, 08:19 PM.

                    Comment


                    • BadCeeJay1975
                      Editing a comment
                      Ultimate General: Gettysburg is 90% off at the moment on Steam if you want to get a feel for the size and complexity of the battle. As far as realtime strategy games go, this is as accessible as they come while still deep enough to be a good challenge to veteran strategy gamers.

                      https://store.steampowered.com/app/3...al_Gettysburg/

                  • Borderlands 3 - Claptrap Presents: Pandora



                    :)

                    Comment




                    • :)

                      Comment


                      • hasmeh
                        Editing a comment
                        It will be interesting to learn some new things in Gears 5.

                    • next year will be interesting ….

                      Comment


                      • with many Glofo fact surfacing ...
                        all start to make sense


                        simple perspective
                        slide1=X1 SOC

                        why MS not make X1 24 CU like in Slide2 ?
                        answer:they have it better on Glofo W2W die below=Gfxcore

                        CPU=AMD TSMC part (Jag+12CU (GCN Scalar accelerator)
                        Not Fully Tapped=Gfxcore(Glofo)

                        even match board separate Voltage domain CPU & Gfxcore
























                        Comment


                        • Direct X-Static
                          Editing a comment
                          As you said, next year is going to be interesting!


                      • AMD site updated with explicit tag
                        "Project Scarlett"
                        (link: https://www.amd.com/en) amd.com/en
                        "Navi” Next-Gen Radeon™ RDNA Graphics Architecture"

                        #nextlevel









                        Comment


                        • scottvxr
                          Editing a comment
                          That's all folks😎.


                          Enough said.

                        • mistercteam
                          Editing a comment
                          indeed scott

                        • xboxfandev
                          Editing a comment
                          A friend that work on NVIDIA say that he doesn't believe AMD/Microsoft will have a real ray tracing hardware accelerator on time for Scarlett launch. That AMD/Microsoft will bend their words.

                          I will bet on this site guessing and digging. If we have RT hardware on consoles soon the industry will have more RT hardware software. That will please me a lot.

                      • #boom
                        #toomanysecrets





















































                        Comment


                        • scottvxr
                          Editing a comment
                          Somebody press the FF button already😎.













                      • :)
                        Last edited by Blaze_ATX; 07-04-2019, 03:24 PM.

                        Comment


                        • Blaze_ATX
                          Editing a comment
                          😎

                          :)

                        • scottvxr
                          Editing a comment
                          Were you join Blaze?

                        • Blaze_ATX
                          Editing a comment
                          This is only for some of the Xbox and Windows insiders, unfortunately am not one of them 😕, these screenshots are from one of my twitter friends who is an Windows insiders and have access to the xCloud beta.

                          :)

                        • scottvxr
                          Editing a comment
                          Ok cheer's Blaze, I'll take a look on insider app after work 😎.

                        • Blaze_ATX
                          Editing a comment
                          Cheers, bro. 😎

                          :)

                      • Comment




                        • :)

                          Comment



                          • inline with green one,G Loh also partnered with many MS engineer for other paper/rsrch
                            this is in 2012,

                            #marathon
                            #art_of_xbox

                            320GBps where we heard that ..

                            the diagram showed
                            32bit/16bit=GDDR5
                            64bit and so on=Stacked GDDR5
                            128bit per channel=sweet spot
                            oh X2 has L4 boom












                            Comment


                            • AMD Radeon RX 5700 series review leaked ahead of the embargo lift

                              As you might know, Radeon RX 5700 series reviews will be available on July 7th, alongside AMD Ryzen 3000 series and X570 motherboards. Quite a day for tech enthusiasts and a lot of work for reviewers. A review was published by accident by a Polish site called Benchmark.

                              The review was conducted with early drivers, as explained in the screenshot below. Apparently, these drivers do not even support overclocking. Hence, the results may not correspond to the final performance.















                              https://videocardz.com/newz/amd-rade...view-leaks-out



                              :)
                              Last edited by Blaze_ATX; 07-05-2019, 12:48 PM.

                              Comment


                              • Blaze_ATX
                                Editing a comment
                                Not bad but not that great either. Meh!

                                :)

                              • Direct X-Static
                                Editing a comment
                                It's right where I expected though, because AMD already said the RX 5700 was designed to compete with Nvidia's RTX 2070.

                              • OrionWolf
                                Editing a comment
                                The problem here is Nvida just needs to drop the price of the 2070 for $50 and they've got a much better deal especially when you consider that the 2070 can do RT as well!

                              • Direct X-Static
                                Editing a comment
                                That's a good point, Orion! That's probably why AMD is focusing on "Next Gen Navi" and wants nothing to do with this version other than release it. Everything is better on next gen, and it will feature RCC's, co developed with MS, that'll likely put AMD on top of Nvidia in performance next year.

                            • What developers think of Xbox Game Pass

                              "Choose your development partner as carefully as you choose your love partner."

                              Subscription gaming services such as Xbox Game Pass, EA Access and PlayStation Now have become a good deal for players - or at least, a good way of ensuring you never reach the bottom of your pile of shame. As this year's E3 festivities made plain, they are now central to platform holder strategy, with Microsoft releasing all its first-party titles on Game Pass, and Google Stadia to ship with its own, if rather meagre, subscription game service. But are they always a fair deal for developers? The details of these partnerships remain closely guarded, but in a panel discussion at Gamelab last week hosted by GamesIndustry.biz editor-in-chief Matt Handrahan, some of the people behind Crusader Kings, Rime, Q.U.B.E. and Inside offered broad thoughts on Xbox Game Pass in particular.

                              "Consumers want as many games as possible, as free as possible, and you can't get anything for free, so you need to find the right price, but that's the angle," began Dino Patti, co-founder of Playdead and latterly, Somerville developer Jumpship. "Developers need to look at what does this get me, and for me, and I might be biased, but I think the way business is for Game Pass, it's the first time it's actually what I would consider fair for developers.

                              "[All the other times] I've been suggested subscription it's never worked out, because they don't know what developers need, and in the end, it is developers putting out a game for free!" Patti went on, adding, "with Game Pass they're doing it correctly for the developers."



                              Paradox Interactive ex-CEO Fred Wester was rather cooler on the subject than Patti, suggesting subscription service providers need to be more mindful of the kind of game they're licensing when thrashing out terms with developers. He drew a comparison with how Spotify and Netflix remunerate musicians and film-makers. "Spotify, they pay you depending on how many times your song has been played. On Netflix, they pay you a fixed fee depending on what they think your [product] is worth. Those are two fundamentally different things, and that's what you see here as well.

                              "OnLive, for example - they said you can have your game on our service and we're going to attract a lot of customers, and we're going to deliver you money based on how many hours people play the game. Now at Paradox, we loved that business model, because people play our games for three or four thousand hours. While the Game Pass model to us is still a decent model, we think we're not getting paid enough, because people play our games more than they play very single-player driven narratives."

                              Wester described the investment in games for subscription services as a "gold rush". "I've never seen anything like this in my 16 years in the industry," he went on. "People are throwing money at everything. If you can't make money today in the games industry you'll probably never be able to make money ever - like seriously. If you're an established company, I mean - new companies always struggle."

                              He cautioned developers in attendance, however, that the good times wouldn't roll forever, and advised them to put long-term self-sufficiency first. "What you need to consider now, when people throw money at you is, three years from now when the pendulum has swung back, and all of a sudden you're standing there knocking on Microsoft's door saying 'please let us in again' - which is going to happen eventually, we all know that, hopefully - is your business model sustainable, and has it been the whole time? And do you have direct access to the people playing your games?

                              "Those are the only two things you should think about, because if you sell yourself now, with a business model you don't even believe in, because you get $10m cash in hand, I don't think you're going to have a good time in three years. Because these times are not going to come back. I'm sounding like Dr Doom here, I'm a paranoid man!"



                              Raul Rubio, CEO of Rime developer Tequila Works, expressed this a little more saucily, enjoining developers to "choose your development partner as carefully as you choose your love partner".

                              Q.U.B.E. creator Dan da Rocha was most tentative of all on the idea of releasing over a subscription service. "At the smaller studio scale, if the price is right, that can work, but at this point in time [for us] it would mainly be for back catalogue stuff, to get on there, onto emerging platforms - to test the waters," he said. "I think, you have to look at the numbers to see if it makes sense."

                              The developers also shared thoughts on the ups and downs of the console business in general, commenting that, for all the stripping back of certification procedures and investment in self-publishing programmes, it was still something of a walled garden. "I still feel like there's a barrier to entry for the small developer perhaps, compared to Steam and other PC platforms, but it's become more democratised to get onto those platforms," Rocha went on. "Development kits have become readily available.

                              "Since we came out [with our first game] - back then you had to know someone at Valve. Now the floodgates are open, anyone can be on there. I think there's still that barrier on Xbox, PlayStation and Switch. But once you're through the gate, if you have a new game, once you talk to somebody at that platform, I think it becomes a lot more open."

                              For Dino Patti, a veteran of Xbox Live Arcade's heyday, the strength of the console business is precisely that it's harder to break into than any PC storefront.

                              "The barrier to entry at Microsoft actually wasn't a problem - that was and still is the good thing. I often compare this to an athlete: if you're running really fast in a sports club, nobody notices you. If you go to the Olympics, and you're unknown, at least there will be press around you. If you go to console, you can get press, because not every game gets to go to console."



                              Beyond the implications for individual studios, there are concerns over what subscription services bode for the gaming market and community as a whole. As this editorial from GamesIndustry's North American editor Brendan Sinclair argues, the fact developers don't have access to (often questionably defined) consumption metrics means they have less clout in negotiations with platform holders and publishers. Middlemen, in other words, may benefit from a subscription-driven industry more than creators.

                              Microsoft has said, however, it thinks subscription packages will continue to co-exist with other ways of selling games. "We don't have a goal of being the subscription where you get all your content," head of gaming services Ben Decker told GI in response to the aforesaid editorial. "This is meant to be additive to the ecosystem. We don't see a future where subscriptions are dominant. We see a future where customers have choice between a subscription and purchase-to-own, where there's a mixed ecosystem because that's what customers want, and that's what developers want."




                              https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2...ass-developers

                              :)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X